STSM's blog

Why I Volunteer

Guest Blogger Patrick Anderson is STSM's Volunteer of the Quarter for June of 2014. Patrick's compassionate nature helps him to successfully connect the survivors he serves at the hospital to STSM counseling services. Patrick has responded to 10 hospital calls in the year he has served as an advocate. Patrick serves on STSM's Speakers Bureau and also speaks on the Advocate Panel to help train new advocates. STSM staff especially love when Patrick comes by as he usually brings cookies and milk.

Denim Day

On April 23 in the early 1990s, a young 18 year-old girl is picked up by her 45 year-old driving instructor for her first driving lesson. During the driving lesson, he takes her to an isolated road, pulls her out of the car and wrestles her out of her jeans and rapes her. He then proceeded to threaten her life if she told anyone and has her drive the car home. Later that night, she tells her parents anyway and they seek to press charges against the driving instructor. During the course of the trail, he is duly convicted and sentenced to jail for rape.

Why I Walk: Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin, a senior at USC, guest blogs this week to let us know why she participates in Walk a Mile in Her Shoes, and the power the event holds in the process of healing and hope for survivors in our community.

Walking About A Revolution

In this guest post, one of our most successful team captains shares her experience building a team for Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. Beth Sherouse is an advocate for STSM and recently earned her Ph.D. in History from University of South Carolina. Beth's team - Walking About a Revolution - has raised close to $2,000 for STSM through Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. To donate to Walking About a Revolution or to start your own team, click here.

Student Rights vs. Reality in Colleges' Response to Rape on Campus

Recently, the media has highlighted several instances in colleges nationwide responded to sexual assault experienced by their students in ways that may have violated the student's rights. In this guest blog post, University of South Carolina Student Kathryn Albano reflects on the issue of sexual violence on campus and how the revelations about how schools respond have motivated her to become involved in the fight against sexual violence. 

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes with The Walkie Talkies

In this guest post, one of our most successful team captains shares her experience building a team for Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. Katherine Yon spends her 9-5 promoting Columbia at a local nonprofit and her 5-9 as a super-blogger. Katherine's team - The Walkie Talkies - has raised more than $1,000 for STSM through Walk a Mile in Her Shoes.

Sheriff Leon Lott of the Richland County Sheriff's Department starts by listening.

There is no shame when your loved one dies. When your car is stolen. When you’re diagnosed with cancer. Friends and loved ones gather around you for support. They don’t blame you for "bringing it on yourself."

It should be the same with sexual violence. But all too often, survivors who have the courage to tell someone what happened are blamed for bringing it on themselves. This needs to change.
 
When someone comes to you, what will you do?

Chief Charles McNair of the Cayce Department of Public Safety starts by believing.

There is no shame when your loved one dies. When your car is stolen. When you’re diagnosed with cancer. Friends and loved ones gather around you for support. They don’t blame you for "bringing it on yourself."

It should be the same with sexual violence. But all too often, survivors who have the courage to tell someone what happened are blamed for bringing it on themselves. This needs to change.
 
When someone comes to you, what will you do?

Chief Josh Shumpert with South Congaree Police Department starts by listening.

There is no shame when your loved one dies. When your car is stolen. When you’re diagnosed with cancer. Friends and loved ones gather around you for support. They don’t blame you for "bringing it on yourself."

It should be the same with sexual violence. But all too often, survivors who have the courage to tell someone what happened are blamed for bringing it on themselves. This needs to change.
 
When someone comes to you, what will you do?

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